Lesser-Known Attractions in Hong Kong

Lantau Island pic
Lantau Island
Image: discoverhongkong.com

Attorney at law Geoffrey “Geoff” Scovil has a private law firm in Albuquerque, New Mexico. When he’s not busy trying cases or writing petitions to the state supreme court, Geoffrey Scovil enjoys traveling outside of Albuquerque. Over the years, he has visited such places as Hong Kong.

Featuring a unique blend of numerous cultures and influences, Hong Kong is home to an array of major and lesser-known attractions. Following are just a few of Hong Kong’s hidden tourist attractions:

Lantau Island – As Hong Kong’s largest island, Lantau Island provides visitors with a calming escape from the city. The island’s historic and natural heritage has been preserved over the years, and tourists can enjoy everything from clean beaches and countryside to small fishing villages. There are a few big attractions on the island, meaning the preserved natural and cultural areas are often overlooked.

Kowloon Walled City Park – Originally the home of 3.3 million people, Kowloon was built as a military base. It was later occupied by immigrants and eventually became a relatively lawless area filled with drugs, gangs, and unlicensed businesses in the 1950s and 1960s. Although much of the city was demolished, the remnants are open to the public.

Ping Shan Heritage Trail – Appropriate for tourists who love history, the Ping Shan Heritage Trail takes visitors to some of Hong Kong’s most interesting historic sites. Many of these sites are found in the New Territories and include everything from monuments and monasteries to temples and Hakka villages.

Remote Places to See in Hong Kong

Dragon’s Back pic
Dragon’s Back
Image: tripadvisor.com

As a proponent of constitutional rights, Geoffrey “Geoff” Scovil is also committed to defending people who are indigent in criminal cases. An attorney at law since 1998, he is currently working as a solo practitioner in Albuquerque. When not focusing on his work, Geoffrey Scovil leaves Albuquerque for periods to travel to different parts of the world. One of the places he has visited is Hong Kong, China.

About 236 islands make up the archipelago of Hong Kong, a large number of which are local and tourist favorites. Some of these islands are iconic, while others are lesser known. The most popular tourist spots tend to become crowded, especially during the peak season, so tourists may want to consider the following remote yet striking spots in Hong Kong.

1. Dragon’s Back – Its ridge-top path, looking much like the spine of a dragon, is considered a stunning hiking trail in Shek O Country Park.

2. Sai Wan Swimming Shed – This last surviving swimming shed on the westernmost part of the island has become quite popular with Instagram users.

3. Cape D’Aguilar Lighthouse – Built in 1875 on the southeastern tip of the island, the Cape D’Aguilar Lighthouse is one of five surviving prewar lighthouses, and the oldest in Hong Kong.